• Riot, looting prompt state of emergency, curfew in Baltimore

    Police are injured amid the chaos that prevailed after the funeral for Freddie Gray.

    Associated Press12 mins ago
  • World 'closer than ever' to Iran nuclear deal, Kerry says

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The world is "closer than ever" to reaching a comprehensive nuclear deal with Iran but the work is far from over, with key issues unresolved, Secretary of State John Kerry on Monday told a global gathering on nuclear disarmament, where he and Iran's foreign minister met on the sidelines.

    Associated Press
  • Baltimore erupts in riots after funeral of man who died in police custody

    By Ian Simpson BALTIMORE (Reuters) - Baltimore erupted in violence on Monday as hundreds of rioters looted stores, burned buildings and injured at least 15 police officers following the funeral of a 25-year-old black man who died after he was injured in police custody. The riots broke out just a few blocks from the funeral of Freddie Gray and then spread through much of West Baltimore in the most violent U.S. demonstrations since arson and gunfire in Ferguson, Missouri, last year. Firefighters battled several blazes on Monday evening, including a fire under investigation that consumed a church's senior center under construction in East Baltimore. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, a Republican, declared a state of emergency and sent in the National Guard.

    Reuters
  • Stage set for landmark U.S. Supreme Court gay marriage arguments

    By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A day before the U.S. Supreme Court hears landmark arguments on whether the Constitution provides a right to same-sex marriage, activists on both sides of the contentious social issue converged on the white marble courthouse to voice their views. Anti-gay rights activists rallied in front of the courthouse steps condemning same-sex marriage, while a line snaked around the block of people, many displaying gay rights messages, hoping to snag one of the limited number of seats available in the courtroom for Tuesday's 2-1/2 hour oral arguments. The nine justices will be hearing arguments concerning gay marriage restrictions imposed in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee, four of the 13 states that still outlaw such marriages. The ruling, due by the end of June, will determine whether same-sex marriage will be legal nationwide.

    Reuters
  • Nurses union plans short strikes in California and Illinois

    A union representing nurses in California and Illinois said on Monday 6,400 members planned to walk off their jobs later this week for a series of one- and two-day strikes amid contract negotiations. Issues in contention vary from location to location, but include salary, health benefits and nurse-to-patient staffing ratios, said Chuck Idelson, spokesman for the California Nurses Association. Unless progress is made in contract negotiations over the next two days, union nurses will walk out on Thursday and Friday at Kaiser Permanente's Los Angeles Medical Center, Idelson said. They also plan to strike for one day on Friday at two hospitals owned by Providence Health and Services, St. Johns Hospital in Santa Monica and Little Company of Mary in the Los Angeles suburb of Torrance.

    Reuters
  • Loretta Lynch sworn in as new U.S. attorney general

    Loretta Lynch was sworn in Monday as the 83rd U.S. attorney general, becoming the first African-American woman to serve as the nation's top law enforcement official.

    Associated Press
  • Parents of Colorado theater shooting victim fear copycat massacre

    Tom and Caren Teves, parents of theater shooting victim Alex Teves, fear that irresponsible coverage of the massacre’s trial could spark another rampage elsewhere.

  • Police targeted, stores looted in Baltimore riots

    Rioters looted stores and pelted police with rocks in Baltimore on Monday after the funeral of an African American man whose death in custody has reignited outrage over US police conduct towards blacks. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency in the port city of 620,000 and activated the National Guard as rioters prowled in small groups, ransacking shops and trashing police vehicles. NBC affiliate WBAL reported there had been at least one arrest, and the Baltimore Orioles baseball team postponed its evening game against the Chicago White Sox. Fear of unrest prompted the University of Maryland's downtown campus, corporate offices and the city's famous Lexington Market to shut down early.

    AFP
  • Gay businessmen apologize for co-hosting Ted Cruz event

    Two gay hotel owners who co-hosted an event for Texas Sen. Ted Cruz have apologized after many in the LGBT community joined a call to boycott their properties for catering to a conservative politician who is staunchly opposed to same-sex marriage.

  • Baltimore man who died in police custody mourned

    Family and friends gathered Monday for the funeral of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man whose death in custody triggered a fresh wave of protests over US police tactics. Thousands of people arrived at the New Shiloh Baptist church to pay final respects to Gray, who died on April 19 of severe spinal injuries, a week after his arrest in Baltimore.

    AFP
  • Nepal quake death toll tops 4,000; villages plead for aid

    The death toll from Saturday's massive earthquake soared past 3,700.

    Associated Press
  • Justice Ginsburg has already made up her mind on gay marriage

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the 82-year-old leader of the Supreme Court’s minority liberal wing, has cast aside her usual restraint in the past months and left little doubt where she stands on the upcoming gay marriage case.

  • Clinton Foundation acknowledges mistakes in revealing donors

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The acting chief executive of the Clinton Foundation says the global philanthropy is working quickly to remedy mistakes it made in how it disclosed donors, saying that its policies on transparency and contributions from foreign governments are "stronger than ever."

    Associated Press
  • Republican presidential contenders woo evangelical voters

    By Luciana Lopez DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) - Republican presidential hopefuls in Iowa and elsewhere have recently begun sounding a call to arms to Christian conservatives, describing what they say is an urgent threat to religious liberty. Citing high-profile dust-ups over religious freedom bills in Indiana and Arkansas, the contenders are painting a vivid picture of faith under fire. “In the past month, we have seen religious liberty under assault at an unprecedented level,” Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said on Saturday at a forum sponsored by the Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition outside Des Moines.

    Reuters